A Sacred Heart Litany for Mercy

Divine Mercy

I mean to post this on Divine Mercy Sunday, but you know how these things get away from us…! But I think our Good Shepherd has carved some time out for me today, to help me post it on Good Shepherd Sunday — and Mother’s day! Our Lady is always quietly helping us along…

A devotion that I have been trying to keep up some months now, inspired by a close relative who is in great need, is to pray every day at 3:00pm, the Hour of Mercy. I try to at least pray for 5 minutes, and even that is sometimes difficult! (I make no e-pretenses to piety!) In my efforts to hold out the whole five minutes, I’ve found having some set prayers on my smartphone (in an Evernote note posted to the main page) makes it so easy I have no excuses.

I have been praying this prayer at the Hour of Mercy, a Litany to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, and a prayer to my patron St. Joseph. But I found that on my bad days — you know the kind — the great tumult of “have mercy on us” in the litany was almost unbearable to get through. I don’t mean to slight the prayer by any means — I just found that, with my particular failings and melancholic tendencies, I found myself so often praying it in the wrong spirit, rather than the spirit intended.

Divine Mercy

I value the prayer, “Have mercy on us,” so much, especially as St. Faustina and her visions of Mercy (and her/our great need of it) was instrumental to my early growth in faith. But I found myself time and time again, at the end of prayer, in a spirit of self-condemnation, rather than trusting humility. It was as if, the more I said “Have mercy on us,” the less I believed He would — or rather, that I was worthy of accepting it. And without realizing it, I wasn’t accepting that mercy. I was wrapped up in a feeling of self-despair, and consequently a lack of faith in God and His infinite mercy.

And the more I thought about it, the more I think that this might be the particular temptation of our age: self-condemnation, and lack of trust. After all, that was the specific message Our Lord gave to St. Faustina to spread in the 20th Century: Jesus, I trust in You.

In ages past, when secularism had not taken such deep root, sin was a concept much more familiar to people — even to Christians, who are necessarily affected by the temper of the age, no matter how hard we try to live “in but not of” it. The reality of sin, the necessity of contrition, and the gratuitous glory of Christ’s Mercy were much more present to people.

But our culture today is built entirely around denying the reality of sin, the existence of anyone to offer contrition to, or– and most importantly– the possibility of merciful forgiveness.

In the modern secular mind (the mentality in which I was raised), a fundamental inability to believe in Mercy–that is, forgiveness of all the things we do that weigh upon us, whether we can admit it or not–is what causes us to run so fast and so far from the recognition of sins. We feel the weight of our sins but project the recognition of their destructiveness onto a society/religion/political group we label “judgmental” so we don’t have to realize how much we are condemning ourselves. We have created a religion of Tolerance in order to condone sins that we cannot face to create a synthetic mercy — a forgiveness for which there is nothing to forgive. And yet we always feel the prick of that self-condemnation — self-judgement untempered by a mercy we cannot believe in — and that is why we are the most deeply angry — truly, truly angry — group of people in this fallen world.

And perhaps my readers — I assume you are religious already or you wouldn’t find much of interest here! — think I am throwing around this “we” too lightly. Well, the fact of the matter is we are all affected by our society, whether we are home-schooled amid a happy circle or brought up in the thick of the cultural jungle. Having grown up in the thick of secularism, I would have presumed that I have it worse off than others — and then I met cradle Catholics, ha! But seriously — every single one of us has our own particular temptation to hate or condemn ourselves, and we are all living in the midst of a culture that refuses to recognize sin, out of an agonizing despair of mercy.

And by agonizing, think of the dark night of a soul which has never known daybreak. This is why they frantically break flares of Tolerance and wave them around like they’re salvation. It’s all they have to see in that deep, swallowing darkness of the condemnation the soul has for itself, without any knowledge or acceptance of mercy.

The leaders and shapers of our culture are living in this darkness. They need prayer much more than lobbyists or internet invectives.

And as Catholics and Christians, we are living in a society that is shaped by their mindset. It is the fallen reality. It would be hubris to think we can hold our toes up, pure, of the culture in which we live. We must fight the same temptations they do — but, most thankfully, we fight with much better weapons than they do. We fight knowing we are in a battle, and whom to fight. And we have an arsenal of prayer.

That is why I decided to change up my own daily litany to the Sacred Heart of Jesus — not because I am not in need of mercy (HA!), but because the particular way in which I need to ask for it is through an act of faith. My great temptation is not to ignore sins I am perfectly aware of, but to feel the weight of them so badly that I bury my head from the possibility of mercy.

Instead of a petition–have mercy on us–which, to be really effective, must be done in a spirit of confidence in Christ, I have found my spirit much more open to grace when I make my litany an act of faith–Jesus, I trust in You. This is something I have to say over, and over, and over again to really let it sink into my soul.

Our souls have a tendency, these days, to become tight and closed from sorrow and fear, like tender flowers closing up when the sun has abandoned them. But even when the Son shines on them we are afraid to open! This prayer has helped my heart bloom open, when I didn’t even know it had shut. So I am posting it here in case it helps another.

Divine Mercy Litany of the Sacred Heart

V. Lord, have mercy on us.
R. Christ, have mercy on us.
V. Lord, have mercy on us. Christ, hear us.
R. Christ, graciously hear us.

God the Father of Heaven,
have mercy on us.
God the Son, Redeemer of the world,
have mercy on us.
God the Holy Spirit,
have mercy on us.
Holy Trinity, one God,
have mercy on us.

Heart of Jesus, Son of the Eternal Father,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, formed by the Holy Spirit in the Virgin Mother’s womb,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, substantially united to the Word of God,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, of infinite majesty,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, holy temple of God,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, tabernacle of the Most High,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, house of God and gate of heaven,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, glowing furnace of charity,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, vessel of justice and love,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, full of goodness and love,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, abyss of all virtues,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, most worthy of all praise,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, King and center of all hearts,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, in whom are all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, in whom dwells all the fullness of the Godhead,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, in whom the Father was well pleased,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, of whose fullness we have all received,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, desire of the everlasting hills,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, patient and rich in mercy,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, rich to all who call upon You,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, fount of life and holiness,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, propitiation for our offenses,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, overwhelmed with reproaches,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, bruised for our iniquities,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, obedient even unto death,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, pierced with a lance,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, source of all consolation,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, our life and resurrection,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, our peace and reconciliation,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, victim for our sins,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, salvation of those who hope in You,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, hope of those who die in You,
I trust in you.
Heart of Jesus, delight of all saints,
I trust in you.

Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the world,
spare us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the world,
graciously hear us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the world,
have mercy on us.

Jesus, meek and humble of Heart,
make our hearts like unto Thine.

Let us pray.

Almighty and eternal God, look upon the Heart of Thy most beloved Son and upon the praises and satisfaction which He offers Thee in the name of sinners; and to those who implore Thy mercy, in Thy great goodness, grant forgiveness in the name of the same Jesus Christ, Thy Son, who livest and reignest with Thee forever and ever. Amen.

Saint Joseph Morning Offering

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He is Risen, Alleluia! He is truly risen, Alleluia, alleluia!

To celebrate, I wanted to share a prayer with you.

st josephIn so many ways, Saint Joseph has been calling to me lately.

In a winding path, as they always are, of joy and sudden sorrow, he reached out to me lately as a special patron over me and my family.

One of my Lenten devotions (warning: low bar this year!) was to be sure to say a morning prayer or offering each day, and I decided to include a daily prayer to St. Joseph to make my devotion more concrete.

After all, there’s nothing like total silence to wither a blossoming relationship, and I am nothing if not a creature of habit. Got to plan these things into my day or I just never get to them.

Unfortunately, so many prayers to Saint Joseph focus entirely on purity, or having a well-confessed death.

All good things, but I wanted my morning focus to be on the promise and challenges of the day ahead.

So I adapted a lovely one I found online somewhere, and ended up with this.

O Glorious Saint Joseph, I choose you today for my special patron in life and at the hour of my death. Preserve and increase in me the spirit of prayer and fervor in the service of God. Remove far from me every kind of sin, and obtain for me a holy and contrite death.

Protect my soul and my family from the snares of the Enemy, and provide us a home in which our love for God increases daily. Hold me fast to your Son all my days, so that when my race is run I may breathe forth my soul with joy into the hands of Jesus and Mary.

Amen.

Clean Eating Weekly Meal Plan

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So, after some health issues and tips from my crunchy healthcare provider, plus having made a decision to cut some of the massive time commitments in my life, I’ve finally decided to become more responsible for our family meals (goodbye fast food circuit!), and go “clean” while we’re at it. And to give myself some accountability, I’ve decided to share my meal plans with you, dear internet! Plus, they may be useful to anyone trying to eat less processed foods, fewer carbs, more veggies, or just get on the ball and plan some meals.

I also recently “contributed” to (not “purchased” or “ordered,” they insist) a giant basket of fruits and veggies from a co-op in my area, Bountiful Baskets. They’re in a lot of states all over the U.S., so if you’re interested at all, I’d encourage you to check them out and “contribute to” a basket. There’s no weekly commitment–you just have to jump on the “contribution” site the second they go up (Monday mornings) so you can get the good ones before they run out–so it’s easy to try. You get a TON of fruits and veggies for a grand total of …. wait for it … $15.00. Such a steal! And if we’re ever more flush (haha), I’ll pay an extra $10 for organics.

What I love about the co-op (I swear I’m not a paid advertiser! In fact, no one’s paid; it’s entirely volunteer-run) is that 1) it’s cheap!, 2) it gives me a set number of healthy fruits & veggies to plan meals around and easily force good foods into my diet, 3) the co-op orders as local as it can, from small farmers rather than giant conglomerates, and skims all the supermarket-overhead off the whole business, and 4) it cuts out all the big-company drama to put the transactions (and food!) back in the hands of consumers and farmers! :)

And did I mention cheap? For $15 I got a laundry basket-full of: 1 Romain lettuce head (bunch? I’m so veggie-ignorant), 1 bunch of spinach, 1 bunch asparagus,  1 bunch broccoli, 3 hugely long cucumbers, 1 bag of peppers (multi-colored? no idea what kind), 1 box mini organic heirloom tomatoes (SOOO delicious!), 4 giant pears, 7 oranges, 9 apples, 1 bunch bananas, and 1 acorn squash. I also paid $12 for an “add-on” of 5 loaves of organic multi-grain bread (which tastes like a nutty little slice of heaven!).

Of course, Thing 1 and Thing 2 had consumed all the apples and bananas by the next day! But then I made a list, and this morning I sat down to the computer (pinterest, mostly, of course!) and made a meal plan for the week. I only planned the dinners, except for when I’ll have to remember to pack sandwiches; mostly the tater tots and I will just eat leftovers or something scrambled up from the fridge.

I used my Weekly Meal Plan sheet that I made and printed out: first I filled in the “groceries” side with my Bountiful Basket bounty, plus whatever meats and grains I had on hand. Then I hit the internets to find recipes that fit the bill. Not easy, with set ingredients and a “clean eating” requirement!

If you’d like to whip up your own meal plan from what you have on hand, go ahead and download my free Weekly Meal Plan. The sites I mainly browsed are my pinterest “Clean Eating” board, The Gracious Pantry, and He and She Eat Clean.

Sooo, without further ado, here’s my dinner plan for the week:

Monday:Weeknight Spaghetti

Tuesday: Coconut Almond Cranberry Chicken with Parmesan Broccoli

Wednesday: Greek Chicken with this Cucumber salad (or this one)

Thursday: Fromage burgers and Salad from mixed greens and mini heirloom tomatoes

Friday: Cheese tortellini (already in fridge) with zucchini or spinach (whatever’s left by then!) and herby creamy sauce (improv-style)

Saturday: Parmesan chicken with Romaine lettuce

Sunday: Taco [and Quinoa] stuffed acorn squash with oven-roasted asparagus

Snacks: oranges (sliced)

pears (fresh, sliced and dipped like french fries, or oven-baked with cinnamon sprinkled on top)

cucumber slices and hummus

Clean Eating Pear Oatmeal Cookies

That’s it! Hope you (and my fam) enjoy!

The Brazeness of Prayer

How to get your kids to pray - MarianMartha

If you grew up reciting prayers, or even offering off-the-cuff prayers, holding hands, in the Protestant tradition, you may be so used to prayer that it doesn’t strike you how incredibly bold — forthright even — prayer is.

Then again, I don’t think it really hit me until after I had a three-year-old (now a four-year-old AND a three-year-old who mimics her brother’s every move!) to try to teach manners.

“I want mac-and-cheese.” “Give me your soda.” “I want my bedtime song now” (after half an hour of kicking and screaming). Or, of course, the classic FIT. It’s like babies (who can’t help it), but with rational words. Gimme, gimme, gimme.

So what do we say when we speak to our Father in Heaven?

Well, sure, we start off good –  “Our Father, who art in Heaven, hallowed be Thy name.” Nice and polite.

“Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done, on earth as it is in Heaven.” Very appropriate, very true. Humbling thoughts.

But next…?

“Give us this day our daily bread.”

My goodness, that could be a high-minded paraphrase of my kids at breakfast this morning. But what’s more–

“And forgive us our trespasses.”

WHAT! Not even a please? Not even a QUESTION?!

Sure, we temper it with a good caveat, “…as we forgive those who trespass against us,” but that’s all too easy to overlook, as we head off to the next demand…

“And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.”

Boy, we don’t ask much, do we? And all with such frankness, so little meekness, it seems. We don’t even ASK, we just demand.

I actually struggled with this, for a while, after my conversion. Sin (and redemption!) is a tricky and thorny thing for anyone to comprehend, I think, and for someone raised in a secular mindset it’s hard to find anything in your imagination between innocence and damnation. Either you’re good, or you’re bad, and everyone else’s job is to cast you out of society. If you’re good, it means you try and mean well, and don’t screw up so bad that you need to be put in jail. Anything that you do, if you’re “good,” is therefore to be overlooked.

So coming to terms with myself as a person who sins and can be — is — forgiven, well that’s been a trick. I’m still learning, and I think we all are.

So I go to the church, the Bible, the writings of Saints and communities of Christians to try to find out how I, a person with such a debt forgiven (and being forgiven daily), could appeal to the God Almighty? How can I bring my small wishes and earthly needs before my Savior? How can I ask him to give me anything?

Well, they told me, you just tell Him to.

You just ask.

It’s incredible, as incredible as salvation itself, but it’s true. That crazy story He was telling people about whenever you knock in the middle of the night, when any sane person would call you crazy and send you home, the Father will open the door … it’s so hard to imagine, but it’s just the way it is.

And not like a story, like aww, how sweet, let’s put it in a Hallmark card.

Like, Give us this day our daily bread, cuz you’re our Daddy and that’s your job.

That’s the position He put Himself in with us — he said, Call me Daddy, because I’m going take care of you like my little children, everything a parent is obligated to do,

even though I’m not obligated but choose to make you my own. Choose to make myself yours.

Call me Father, and ask me for things like your kids ask you:

Our Father, who art in Heaven…

Give us Your mercy!

Because I will.

Best weeknight throw-together meal ever: Easy Stir-Fry Recipe

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I haven’t posted here in ages, so I’ll make it short and sweet to encourage myself about how easy it is!

Tonight I had an amazing experience, which happens to me so rarely (culinary success!) that I thought the whole internet should know. I was overtired, my hub was stuck in traffic as usual, and I completely forgot to make dinner until 7pm (about 1/2 hour before Bedtime)! At that point, when my husband got home, I suddenly realized I needed to do something, before those kids discovered a grown-up sweets stash and made that their dinner while I wasn’t looking.

The trouble was, I had no real protein in the house. Just eggs. I’ve frittata’d my way out of that situation many a time, but this time I had no time, and I had something else: the big pot of rice leftover from last night that we never finished off. Again. I’ve thrown away too many giant tubs of unfinished rice from my over-ambitious little rice cooking heart.

Never again, I tell you.

I did a quick google, and my world was opened up (this is probably news to no one but me): Fried rice!

So, so easy. I had some almost-spoiled fresh broccoli in the fridge, and it was fantastic just thrown in the pan early on, cooked but with a nice crunch.

My four-year old even scarfed down four bowls of the stuff. He’s a carb-eater, so it was nice to sneak in protein with the eggs hidden in the rice. He even ate up all the broccoli “trees” with delight!

So, here’s the “recipe”:

Ingredients

Whatever’s on hand! I used:

  • 2-3 cups day-old cooked rice
  • 2-3 tsp pre-chopped garlic
  • 1 fresh broccoli head, chopped into bite-size florets
  • 3 eggs, scrambled
  • ginger, salt, garlic salt, pepper to taste
  • Soy sauce to taste (I did one good sprinkling, which was delish; I added another later and it was too much for us)

What do to

  1. Heat up a big wok pan on the stove
  2. Add oil, garlic and sauté a minute or so, while you chop broccoli
  3. Add broccoli and sauté about five minutes
  4. Add rice, more oil, and soy sauce if desired. Keep stirring to mix and fry. Season as desired.
  5. Judge by your rice, but when you’re almost done, make a hole in the middle and pour in scrambled eggs. Let set a bit then scramble into the rice, stirring until all of it is cooked and distributed throughout.
  6. If desired, add seasonings and let them cook in just a bit, then (if wild animals are leaping at your elbows, demanding supper) serve!

I LOVE recipes like this that you can throw together from whatever’s in your fridge!

Again, I’m sure I’m the last person to discover this, but the great thing about the internet is someone is always discovering something entirely new to them that the rest of the internet seems up to its neck in!

But if anyone stumbles across this blog who’s done this for ages, let me know what variations you do! I’d love to add them to our repetoire — I think this is going to be a regular, day-after-chicken-and-rice meal!

Because Jesus Is There

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I wanted to share something that happened with the kidlets the other day, one of those “from the mouths of babes” moments that awe and humble us best. Proof, once again, that kids are way smarter than the rest of us.

In the effort to make some connections, get the kids (and me) some social time and not go crazy, we recently joined a local playdate “meetup” group.  The first meetup we went to was at a library singing-and-dancing story time we hadn’t known about (which, by the way, is the SMARTEST. THING. EVER. Whoever thought up the idea of quiet library story times for large groups of 1- to 4-year-olds was just trying to torture parents and innocent library patrons alike!)

So, the singing-dancing story time was a big hit with my two. It was fun to watch their different personalities, as Rocky ran out to the front of the group and started acting out the motions with big-armed gusto, while Rosie hung back in the great crowd of wiggling kids and gravitated to my lap.

At the beginning (as we now know well), the children’s librarian who leads it always starts with a “Hello” song, and at the beginning she calls out, “Everybody turn to somebody you love and give them a big hug!” Well, Rocky, being way up ahead of Rosie and I, turns and looks around himself for a minute as the kids around him run to the sides to hug their moms (and one dad ;). Then he runs up to the front and hugs the librarian (a perfect stranger) by the leg, catching her by surprise just as she’s turning away.

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I thought it was so cute, I told his dad about it after we got home. Kind of surprised, he turned to Rocky and asked him about it. “When she said to hug somebody you love, you hugged the librarian?” And Rocky’s response was, “Yeah!”

“Why?” Dad asked.

“Well… because Jesus was there!”

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And bam. You’re officially in one of those parent moments when you realize you’ve been visited with unadulterated truth from the mouths of babes, and you really haven’t been living up to something that is completely obvious to a three-year-old.

Well, of course she was somebody he loved.

She’s the image and likeness of God. She bears Jesus in her heart, in her body, in her soul.

What’s not to love?

All I can say is, thank you, God, for reminding me how much more loving this heart needs to be doing. And for blessing these babes with such a lovely view of You!

How to Get Your Kids to Pray in One Easy Step!

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You guys are going to love this–my hubby discovered this one night last week, as we were launching into the most recent prayer-time battle before putting the kids to bed. (You think we’d have noticed our major family prayer time always happens right before bedtime, that most delightful of times for toddlers! But no.)

So what is the one surefire way to get your kids to pray? Don’t tell them to!

I know, I know … what is this, the height of passive parenting? But hear me out. Ever since I became a Catholic — and a Christian mother — I’ve heard the question go around: How can we help our kids grow up loving Christ and the Church while they grow up in a world set against them? How can we show them the beauty of these things that our culture hates?

I have to admit, as a convert, the anxiety somewhat mystifies me. After all, I grew up planted smack-dab in the middle of that world, and I grew to love Him more than any of it. But when I look at the families of Catholics and Christians I know, and see the struggles of those that have fallen away, I recognize the importance of my job as a parent.

But, looking at my experience and those of folks I know, I’ve decided there’s one thing I need to do to guide my children toward the Lord: Get out of the way!

In so many instances, when people have been pushed away from the Church, you can see how they’re reacting against some behavior of Christians. Obviously, the person who turns away from Christ is himself to blame for his actions, but it is easy to see where a pushy mom, or a controlling dad, becomes a stumbling block to a young person.

And often, our very anxiety about our job as Christian parents becomes our biggest difficulty, which can lead us to guilt trips and excessive expectations. We feel like we need to do something when we can’t see our kids growing in prayer life as we expect them to, and when we feel that pressure we pass it on to them, and they reject it. Who wouldn’t? They can’t sort out the piety from the pressure, and they just want out.

Which leads me to Exibit A: my son. (No, not really the kid in the picture — mine’s only 3!  ;)

We had been having a short family prayer in the kids’ room just before putting them to bed. Nothing fancy, no rosaries for the under-three set, but kneeling down before a picture of Jesus and Mary on their wall and telling Jesus we love Him and thanking Him for things they enjoyed that day.

Well, little Rocky, 3, usually got into it, while Rosie, 2, ran around being oblivious. But all of a sudden, Rocky slammed on the brakes. One night, as Dad turned to him and said, “What do you want to pray for?” he clammed up, and wouldn’t say anything. Next night, he was falling all over us and mooning about the room worse than the two-year-old.

So Dad and I found ourselves getting more and more pushy, surprised at this sudden shift in a kid who loved to pray so much before. “Come on, Rocky, it’s your turn to pray now.” “Okay, what do you want to say to Jesus?” “You need to thank Jesus, Rocky!” To the point where we would demand that he say something before we could officially “end” prayertime. But we felt it getting out of hand.

After about a week of this, Dad suddenly turns to me and says, “You know what? We’re putting all the pressure on him, even though it’s something he likes to do. We need to back off the pressure, and he’ll come around.”

So that night, as we knelt down for prayertime and the shenanigans started up, we said to him, “Okay, Rocky, now Mommy and Daddy are going to pray, but you don’t have to say anything. Don’t pray. Today just mommy and daddy are going to pray.” And immediately he perked up, stopped rolling around the floor and climbing under furniture, and listened to us while we prayed. It was beautiful!

The next night, he knelt down next to us as we underscored the same concept. And the next night, he interrupted us as we were saying the sign of the cross at the end of the prayer to say, “But I want to say something, too!” :)

How to get your kids to pray - MarianMartha

We were so thrilled. We were so proud of him, and he could tell, and he was so proud of himself. For days after that, he had an explosion of prayer, asking that we kneel down and pray at all sorts of times, about all different things! It was amazing.

So, that’s my advice for whenever you get worried about your kids’ praying habits: consider their age, and whatever you are worried they’re not doing, back off. Take a deep breath, get out of the way, and set the example — kids are beautiful, they’ll just coming running along up behind you and keep running out beyond you! Sometimes we have to make ourselves remember, Jesus didn’t say, “And make sure to shove those crazy kids into the door of the church so they can hear about me!” He said,

Let the children come to me, and do not prevent them; for the kingdom of heaven belongs to such as these.” — Matt 19:14

If I have any readers out there, what has been your experience? Has something like this ever happened to you?

Corpus Christi Prayer for Offering

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Happy Feast of Corpus Christi!

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It occurred to me, so I thought I would post this little prayer for offering up our sufferings to God. And today seems like a perfect day for revisiting our devotion to the sacrifice of Christ and our need to unite our suffering to His perfect sacrifice! I have not been very good at it lately (am I ever?) and in Mass today this prayer came to me so I want to share it before I forget it! And hopefully that way I will remember to pray it myself…

I’m not sure if he has a post about it yet on his own blog, but my husband, Joseph, often thinks about the necessity of offering our sufferings up to God, as well as the impossibility of our doing it on our own. We need to beg for the graces to offer them up, since Christ is the only perfect sacrifice.

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I don’t know about you, but how true that is for me! I have such a hard time offering up my sufferings, when they’re really tough ones. I want to hold on so hard to the frustration, to the begrudging anger at a person or myself or — yes, though I hate to admit it — God, for allowing or doing or saying such a thing.

So today in Mass, I received the grace of this little prayer — the grace in fact to even realize I should say a prayer to help me be more willing in my sacrifices! More and more in my Christian life I’m learning how we don’t need to have these good thoughts/desires/actions blooming in us to begin with — since they never come from us to begin with, but through the grace of God alone! — and I’m learning how to ask for the grace to want to pray and do good.

Quite a revelation for someone who grew up in a mindset of self-reliance! But from what I’ve seen of those raised in Christianity, as well, it’s quite a revelation for all of us.

But at any rate, here’s the prayer:

Most Sorrowful Jesus, please unite my sorrows to your most holy wounds, and offer them to your Father for the sake of us poor sinners. I abandon all my anxiety and frustration to you, most perfect Sacrifice; please make of me a fragrant offering to the Lord and keep me forever in your most Sacred Heart. Amen.

Don’t Forget to Knock

It’s just one of those days. For you, too?

When all of the to-do’s, and the bills, and the whines of the kids are beating you around the head–right-hook! left-hook! right-left-right!–and you can’t tell which way is up.

Or out–which is, of course, the same thing, if I could just remember to send up a prayer now and then. Or always. Or every single moment of an anxiety-ridden day.

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And then today’s Gospel reading shows up in my inbox, and I get that familiar, friendly slap in the face–the Holy Spirit’s facepalm. Oohhhh, yeahhhh.

Jesus said to his disciples:
“Ask and it will be given to you;
seek and you will find;
knock and the door will be opened to you.
For everyone who asks, receives; and the one who seeks, finds;
and to the one who knocks, the door will be opened. 
Which one of you would hand his son a stone
when he asked for a loaf of bread,
or a snake when he asked for a fish?
If you then, who are wicked,
know how to give good gifts to your children,
how much more will your heavenly Father give good things
to those who ask him.

“Do to others whatever you would have them do to you. 
This is the law and the prophets.”

it almost sounds trite, right? It’s been read, sung, quoted so many times. And it’s sooo easy to doubt… so hard to trust. Really? Anything I ask? Anyone who knocks?

And the Holy Spirit says…

Yes. You. Yes. Your needs, your hopes, your loves. Your greatest joy.

Because you are My joy.

I take joy in simple, (sinful), messy you. I will make you whole and well. In me, you will always be loved. I am taking care of you.

So hush, sweet one.

And don’t forget to knock.

Jesus, my Lord, please provide for me everything I need, everything my husband needs, and everything my children need in this day.

Give me the grace I need to trust in you, and open my heart to receive it and choose You.

Give me the grace to offer up my sufferings and anxieties for those who need prayers, for those who have no one to pray for them. 

Let these sufferings and the sacrifices you bring of them unite me more closely to you.

Make my whole life, my whole heart, your own.

In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Benedict XVI: Pope of Christ’s Love

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I have so many emotions following the announcement of Pope Benedict’s retirement from the Papacy. Sad, so sad to lose this Papa who has stood so firmly for the deep, dynamic truths of the Catholic faith and liturgy. Who has spoken so eloquently, urging us to hold tight to the live-giving truth of Christ in the modern battles against secularism and despair. Who has been, I believe, above all a Pope, an evangelist, of Love.

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I only wish right now I had the time to read the full text of Deus Charitas Est, the encyclical this quote comes from. Perhaps that will be my “positive resolution” (versus the “negative” of giving something up — with heavy quote marks on “negative”! meaning only a lack, not a “bad thing”) this Lent… a few pages a day.

You can see the video of Benedict’s announcement here, or read the text here, but since the Vatican site is running a little slow this morning (can’t imagine why!), I’ll copy the full text here:

DECLARATIO

Dear Brothers,

I have convoked you to this Consistory, not only for the three canonizations, but also to communicate to you a decision of great importance for the life of the Church. After having repeatedly examined my conscience before God, I have come to the certainty that my strengths, due to an advanced age, are no longer suited to an adequate exercise of the Petrine ministry.

I am well aware that this ministry, due to its essential spiritual nature, must be carried out not only with words and deeds, but no less with prayer and suffering. However, in today’s world, subject to so many rapid changes and shaken by questions of deep relevance for the life of faith, in order to govern the barque of Saint Peter and proclaim the Gospel, both strength of mind and body are necessary, strength which in the last few months, has deteriorated in me to the extent that I have had to recognize my incapacity to adequately fulfill the ministry entrusted to me.

For this reason, and well aware of the seriousness of this act, with full freedom I declare that I renounce the ministry of Bishop of Rome, Successor of Saint Peter, entrusted to me by the Cardinals on 19 April 2005, in such a way, that as from 28 February 2013, at 20:00 hours, the See of Rome, the See of Saint Peter, will be vacant and a Conclave to elect the new Supreme Pontiff will have to be convoked by those whose competence it is.

Dear Brothers, I thank you most sincerely for all the love and work with which you have supported me in my ministry and I ask pardon for all my defects.  And now, let us entrust the Holy Church to the care of Our Supreme Pastor, Our Lord Jesus Christ, and implore his holy Mother Mary, so that she may assist the Cardinal Fathers with her maternal solicitude, in electing a new Supreme Pontiff. With regard to myself, I wish to also devotedly serve the Holy Church of God in the future through a life dedicated to prayer.

From the Vatican, 10 February 2013

BENEDICTUS PP XVI

But above all, I feel a great calling–especially with this clear timing at the beginning of Lent, our shared time of introspection, humility, and offering up–to trust in the Church and the Holy Spirit guiding her, that our Papa’s prayerful decision is truly for our best good–plans for our welfare, and not for woe–and that our Church has great things in store.

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As our own Cardinal Dolan said, “”The Holy Father brought the tender heart of a pastor, the incisive mind of a scholar and the confidence of a soul united with His God in all he did. His resignation is but another sign of his great care for the Church. We are sad that he will be resigning but grateful for his eight years of selfless leadership as successor of St Peter.”